It begins. Working Title – Chapter 1.

(Text and images by Ana Spoke. All rights reserved).

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CHAPTER 1

I know terrible things. Big, awful secrets that I can’t unknow, no matter how long I lie awake at night, rolling them over in my mind, sweating over the fantasies of going back in time and undoing all the wrongs, even though I would be powerless to change anything. I “what if” and “I wish” and I wipe away angry tears, but they keep on coming. I wish I was someone else. I wonder what would have happened if my father was never conceived. I cry over what could have been. But most of all, I wish I could go back to the last year, to the day I bought that paint set, so that I could set fire to the damn thing.

*

I moved back in with Pa and the cats thinking it was going to be only temporary, until the divorce came through. I didn’t yet know Alex was on the war path, determined to waste every cent of his and my money on proving that I was some evil, manipulative monster responsible not only for the demise of our marriage, but also for his mental health, life goals and his ability to be gainfully employed. I was sure then that things were about to get better, and how could they not, after a decade of living with an abusive drunk.

Pa couldn’t be happier about his little girl moving back home. He never said anything, but I knew he was secretly relieved that Alex was gone and so were my desperate attempts to cure my husband from his many addictions. He was happy to have my company, too – Pa loved his cats, but the conversations with his flock of strays were mostly one-sided. I would often catch him chattering away as he loaded their bowls with canned food, furry tails of all colors rubbing against his legs. They would meow back occasionally, but once their bellies were full they would move on to licking themselves and generally ignoring Pa and the whole world. Ungrateful creatures. Once I told him so.

“Zey are innocent, Rozochka,” he said. “Zey are like children, don’t know any better. And you know I do it for me. I like feeding.”

He did. Pa was a feeder. I blamed him for my thighs when I was young, before I knew about refined sugar and self-restraint. But when I got married and moved out my thighs got even bigger and it wasn’t until the day Alex picked up our wedding photo and said “boy, you really let yourself go, haven’t you?” that I had to admit it was all me. I can’t even blame Alex for the bout of bulimia that followed. I knew what I was doing. It was hard to show that self-restraint, though, when I found myself back in Pa’s loving care, showered with attention and casseroles.

“I can’t eat this much,” I said one day, sitting down to a plate full of carbs and unidentifiable fat. “This is not healthy, Pa. You need to eat more vegetables.”

“Potatoes are vegetable.”

“But not the butter you’ve drowned them in.” I poked around in the mound, trying to find anything that had not been fried.

He smiled at me, a wrinkly grey angel. “But you love butter, Rozochka.”

“I do.” And I did. But I loved him even more.

*

Come to think of it, my entire life I have searched for a man like Pa to take my hand and wrap me in a warm blanket of love, and care, and protection, and all those things that you expect from a relationship. Twice, I thought I found such a man, but each time they morphed into needy, greedy, gross, lazy, addicted, dependent Peter Pans. They morphed into my father.

I don’t know if I ever loved my father. Every now and then, when he came around and was sober enough to talk to me, he tried to tell me stories of how we used to play together when I was little or about all the times he took me fishing. I never could remember us playing, but I do remember at least one fishing trip when he yelled at me because I wouldn’t sit still in the boat. I remember how he forgot to pick me up from school once and I just stood there, cold and alone, until my mother rolled up, tires screeching and tears streaming down her face. I remember her hugging me for a very long time, and how she kept saying sorry over and over. I don’t remember my father apologizing. But then again, I don’t remember much of him at all. Mom didn’t suffer fools for nearly as long as I did – it was over between them by the time I was in the second grade. From then on it was the three musketeers – Pa, Mom and I. We were happy, so I didn’t understand then why she got married again. I understand now, but when she said we were going to move to Perth to live with Richard, I cried hysterically until it was decided that it would be better for everyone if stayed put. I had nothing personal against Richard, he is still a decent man. I just couldn’t leave Pa. So technically, from the age of eleven I was an orphan.

Eventually Mom had two more kids, and so – again, technically – I have two siblings, but not the kind of siblings with whom I can share the life’s burdens. I have a brother and a sister, but they’d never even met my father, so I can’t talk to them about Dad’s drinking. My brother is fourteen years younger than me, so I can’t ask him to scare off my no-good husband. My sister is even younger, and never been married, so she can’t relate to the seven-year itch. I have been visiting them at least once a year, in summer, but they never came to visit me. I never asked, but I got close to when I moved back in with Pa. I needed someone to share Pa’s obsessive attention.

Other than cat-saving and cat-feeding, some gardening and an occasional trip to the hardware store, Pa didn’t have any other interests. He’d kept mostly to himself his whole life and now there were no buddies to play bridge or whatever else the oldies do when they get together. He never travelled, would not go to restaurants or even movies because everything outside his four walls cost too much. Which I imagine it would if you had close to a dozen dependents at any given time. I never thought about how he’d managed while I was married and preoccupied, he certainly never complained about being lonely. Or anything at all. I only realized that he must’ve been once I was back – every day when I came home from work, he was on the front porch, in one of the rocking chairs, waiting for me.

“You must be tired, Rozochka,” he would say. “I made dinner for you.”

He did. He made dinner for me every single day. But he didn’t stop there. He was never a good sleeper, so he was usually up with the birds, waiting for my alarm to blare, so that he could come to my room and give me my coffee.

“Pa, you don’t have to. Really.”

He would just smile at me and shuffle off back to the kitchen, where I knew he was already making my lunch.

“I put something nice in for you, pet.”

Every day there was something nice. At first it was candy, then after I told him I don’t eat sugar, he started making fruit salad from scratch. Sometimes he’d put in a note, in summer it would be a flower from the garden. Once he put in a book because he thought I might want to read on my break. I should have been happy, and I was, but it was too much. I could never reciprocate enough, not that he expected me to. He never expected anything, but he followed me around like a shadow.

“You want to watch movie, Rozochka?”

“Cup of tea, Rozochka?”

“Rozochka?”

“Rozochka?”

I should have watched more movies with him. I should have hugged him more often, longer, closer. I should have said “thank you.” Instead, I bought him a paint set.

18 Comments

Filed under Self-publishing and marketing

18 responses to “It begins. Working Title – Chapter 1.

  1. olivia layton

    I love the first paragraph. And the rest. This is probably a culture thing (?) but as I was reading I thought pop was the father but I figured it out he was the grandfather. Am I right? I hope so. The writing is excellent and I look forward to reading more. Way to go, Ana! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you! He is, and after some thinking I have decided to rename him – thinking Opa, because they are of Jewish Polish heritage. Can’t stop thinking about the story – was in tears this morning, which is funny cause I made it all up 🙂

      Like

  2. Great start, and very intriguing already…

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I got confused, just like Olivia – I think she sussed it though. The quality of the writing is excellent. Well done, keep it up.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Oh no. I was so wishing you all the joy and happiness in the world. Just remember, none of this is your fault. Don’t do the what ifs. . . .

    Immerse yourself in your art. You are extremely talented and it would be such a waste to give it all up.

    Start anew. Yes, again. Again and again and again – as many times as necessary.

    This too shall pass.

    The silver lining – they say that adversity makes us a better writer. The angst you are feeling could one day occupy the inner workings of one of your characters in that new book you will eventually write. The old adage – write what you know – should be an easy task considering all the events which have occurs over the past few years. Hell, a factionalized version of your life story would be fascinating – truth being stranger than fiction.

    Take care, and keep on trucking. You are worthy!
    Ellen Klock
    Buffalo, New York

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much Ellen. Just wanted to check/clarify – this was the first chapter of my new book, and the real me is as happy as I can be at the moment 🙂 If you felt the emotions of the character so deeply, it’s really the best compliment I could get 🙂

      Like

  5. Very enjoyable start, I would have loved to have carried on reading. Same comment about Pop being confusing at the start, but that’s an easy issue to sort. Look forward to more.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. This is beautiful! Can’t wait to read the next section. You definitely have my attention. Waiting on pins and needles for more!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! Should be able to post the second one by the end of the week. Have the plot all figured out, but it’s hard to write because there’s little chance to fix it later, so I have the pressure to get it right now

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  7. Hi Ana. Very powerful hook and very emotive characters. I ditto the confusion and got a bit weighed down by so many names/relationships so quickly. However, EXCELLENT uncut gem!

    Don’t worry about the pressure of getting it right. You did, after all, caveat the speed and tightness with which you were writing it. (Maybe just do that at the top of every post?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Ben! Pop is now Pa and I will have to explain what’s going on at the top of every post. The speed is something I always grapple with – I think it’s my own impatience showing through. The second chapter is much slower paced and I’m questioning if it’s too slow. I’m out of practice!

      Like

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